Woman lying in a dental chair

Tooth Extraction

Why you may need a tooth removed

Although permanent teeth should last a lifetime, sometimes it might be necessary to remove them. Your dentist might decide about tooth extraction if it is not possible to save your tooth due to severe damage or decay which cannot be repaired by a dental filling or a dental crown.

Why might the tooth need an extraction?

There are several reasons why your tooth might need an extraction, and usually, it involves a tooth which is severely damaged from trauma or caries (decay).

Other reasons include:

  • A crowded mouth – sometimes the tooth might require extraction to make room for other teeth and properly align them.
  • You still have baby teeth which are blocking proper eruption of adult teeth. This extraction of deciduous teeth is usually easier than permanent ones.
  • An infected tooth which not reacting to root canal (endodontic) treatment and you are still in pain and discomfort.
  • There is a risk of infection, and your immune system is compromised, you are receiving chemotherapy or are having an organ transplant.
  • You have very advanced periodontal disease, and a tooth lost bone support.

What to expect with tooth extraction?

 Your dentist will take an x-ray before extraction to confirm the diagnosis, check root position and decide about the best possible option. 

You will receive an injection of a local anaesthetic to numb the area where the tooth will be removed. In most cases, a local anaesthetic is sufficient for tooth extraction. However, if the procedure is complex due to anatomical factors or you are very nervous, you might prefer to have it done under general anaesthesia.

With a simple extraction, the dentist will loosen the tooth and remove it with forceps. Usually, this is a straightforward procedure.

Sometimes, you may require a surgical extraction when the tooth is broken to the gum level; in these cases there is not enough tooth showing in the mouth to easily remove it, and your dentist will need to cut the gum or remove some bone to get access to the tooth. 

How to take care of the extraction site

Your gum may bleed for a few minutes after you have your tooth taken out. 

Before you go home, your dentist will give you advice and explain how to look after your teeth and gums. You will receive a leaflet with aftercare instructions. Please carefully read all of the information included in the leaflet to help yourself for a smooth recovery and healing after the procedure.

When to Call the Dentist

You might suffer from some pain or discomfort after the anaesthetic wears off, and you might find that your saliva is a little pinkish as well. However, if you have excessive bleeding, which does not stop after applying a compress, you should contact the surgery for further advice. You should call your dentist if you experience any of the following:

  1. signs of infection, including fever and chills
  2. Nausea or vomiting
  3. Redness, swelling, or excessive discharge from the affected area.

After the initial healing period, which usually takes about one to two weeks, there are healing and remodelling processes in your bone which may last from three up to even six months. Over time, however, having a missing tooth or teeth can cause shifting and tilting of remaining teeth which may affect your biting and chewing. To prevent movement of other teeth your dentist may advise replacing the missing tooth/teeth with an implant, bridge, or denture.

Little girl with tooth in her hand
wisdom tooth causing pain

Why you may need a tooth removed

Although permanent teeth should last a lifetime, sometimes it might be necessary to remove them. Your dentist might decide about tooth extraction if it is not possible to save your tooth due to severe damage or decay which cannot be repaired by a dental filling or a dental crown.

Why might the tooth need an extraction?

There are several reasons why your tooth might need an extraction, and usually, it involves a tooth which is severely damaged from trauma or caries (decay).

Other reasons include:

  • A crowded mouth – sometimes the tooth might require extraction to make room for other teeth and properly align them.
  • You still have baby teeth which are blocking proper eruption of adult teeth. This extraction of deciduous teeth is usually easier than permanent ones.
  • An infected tooth which not reacting to root canal (endodontic) treatment and you are still in pain and discomfort.
  • There is a risk of infection, and your immune system is compromised, you are receiving chemotherapy or are having an organ transplant.
  • You have very advanced periodontal disease, and a tooth lost bone support.

What to expect with tooth extraction?

 Your dentist will take an x-ray before extraction to confirm the diagnosis, check root position and decide about the best possible option. 

You will receive an injection of a local anaesthetic to numb the area where the tooth will be removed. In most cases, a local anaesthetic is sufficient for tooth extraction. However, if the procedure is complex due to anatomical factors or you are very nervous, you might prefer to have it done under general anaesthesia.

With a simple extraction, the dentist will loosen the tooth and remove it with forceps. Usually, this is a straightforward procedure.

Sometimes, you may require a surgical extraction when the tooth is broken to the gum level; in these cases there is not enough tooth showing in the mouth to easily remove it, and your dentist will need to cut the gum or remove some bone to get access to the tooth. 

How to take care of the extraction site

Your gum may bleed for a few minutes after you have your tooth taken out. 

Before you go home, your dentist will give you advice and explain how to look after your teeth and gums. You will receive a leaflet with aftercare instructions. Please carefully read all of the information included in the leaflet to help yourself for a smooth recovery and healing after the procedure.

When to Call the Dentist

You might suffer from some pain or discomfort after the anaesthetic wears off, and you might find that your saliva is a little pinkish as well. However, if you have excessive bleeding, which does not stop after applying a compress, you should contact the surgery for further advice. You should call your dentist if you experience any of the following:

  1. signs of infection, including fever and chills
  2. Nausea or vomiting
  3. Redness, swelling, or excessive discharge from the affected area.

After the initial healing period, which usually takes about one to two weeks, there are healing and remodelling processes in your bone which may last from three up to even six months. Over time, however, having a missing tooth or teeth can cause shifting and tilting of remaining teeth which may affect your biting and chewing. To prevent movement of other teeth your dentist may advise replacing the missing tooth/teeth with an implant, bridge, or denture.

Dental Examination

Children's Dentistry

Dental Hygienist

Airflow

Dental Fillings

Dentures

Nervous Patients

Tooth Extraction

Cancer Screening

Mouthguards

Get In Touch

Contact Details

Call

01803 380090

Email

reception@parkhilldental.co.uk

Address

Parkhill Dental Practice,
3 Parkhill Road,
Torquay,
TQ1 2AL,
Devon

Hours

Mon - Thur: 8.30am - 5pm
Fri: 8.00 - 3pm
Weekends: closed